Tag Archives: photography

Mickey Avalon Rips Off Diane Coffee

What’s the old saying? “A good artist creates, a great artist steals.” Well if that’s true, Mickey Avalon has just made an attempt at greatness by copying the artwork of Diane Coffee‘s 2013 album My Friend Fish right down to the font. 

Diane Coffee’s own Shaun Fleming posted the side-by-side image on his social media with the comment: “Didn’t know the cover art for My Friend Fish was so iconic 😏. Is @mickey_avalon a fan? The artwork for his new album would certainly suggest so.” 

Mickey Avalon copies Diane Coffee artwork
Mickey Avalon’s new album copies artwork of Diane Coffee’s 2013 album My Friend Fish to a T

 

The photograph for Diane Coffee’s album was shot by Audim Culver, and artwork designed by Jared Bell with input from Fleming, his manager, and Melinda Danielson who also did the makeup. 

Meanwhile on Avalon’s Instagram, the post for his new album only credited photographer Mike Azria. Azria also had the image posted on his page (which he has since deleted). 

Diane Coffee fans took to Avalon’s IG, chastising him for stealing without giving credit. After about seven hours, Avalon finally responded, “I’m obviously a fan. And it was obviously an homage. And it was so obvious, that I obviously didn’t need to explain myself.” But fans weren’t satisfied. 

seabeekay@evndmngo wrote, “Since when do artists steal LITERALLY SOMEONES ENTIRE ALBUM COVER and try to play it off as their own? And then act like it isn’t a big deal/they were inspired by the original artist (while giving 0 credit to the artist they ripped off and only acknowledging the situation until called out 100x) 🤔”

We asked Fleming what he thinks of the situation and he said, “I think it’s pretty silly. It’s also offensive. I woke up to a tweet from a guy named Scott Cooper with a photo that said, ‘I feel old, but who’s Mickey Avalon? His new album art reminds me of something.'” Turns out Cooper had been online when the two albums popped up next to each other. 

“It was just straight plagiarism,” said Fleming. “The exact definition of homage is, ‘a special honor or respect shpown publicly.’ There was nothing honorable or respectful about this. If you are doing it as an homage to an artist, you need to at the very least credit said artist. Or ask me. For him to 100% just copy and paste my artwork, it’s the most disrespectful thing you can do. It’s the first thing they teach you in school is to cite your sources, don’t plagiarize. He should know, being in the business, that this is not cool.” 

“I was really taken aback by the response and all the love and support, not only from my fans but from Mickey Avalon fans. It was both a disturbing day and a really heartwarming day,” said Fleming.  

In response, Fleming has released a Diane Coffee song called Animal along with a photo of himself with hand-drawn tattoos pasted onto the album artwork for Avalon’s 2006 release, along with the comment: “Ok Mickey, two can play at that game! 
Been looking for a reason to show y’all this punk demo (Link in Bio). Album art inspired by Mickey Avalon. 😉” Animal will be released on all platforms by October 18. 

Diane Coffee responds by releasing a new song, Animal, using artwork from Avalon’s 2006 release

We were not able to reach Avalon directly for comment.

 

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Wire at the Beachland Ballroom

DJ Party Sweat spinning before Wire at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson
DJ Party Sweat spinning before Wire at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

From the moment we entered the nostalgic flyer-covered walls of the Beachland Ballroom, it truly felt like stepping into an underground club from the 80s. The groove of DJ Party Sweat’s pulsating vinyl beats set the soundtrack before the ambient pop-noise stylings of Julian Lynch. His solo performance captured the early audience’s attention, with a whispered voice, multi-color guitar, and two briefcases stacked with effects and processors.

Wire (Graham Lewis, Robert Grey, Colin Newman) live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Wire (Graham Lewis, Robert Grey, Colin Newman) live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

With their fourteenth studio album and a career that spans over thirty years, Wire has earned a no-nonsense reputation, especially when it comes to their stage performance. That level of respect for their craft is equally reflected by the devotion of the fans who filled the ballroom floor.

Colin Newman of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Colin Newman of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

The front of the stage was a guitar and gear lover’s dream: from the massive Eastwood hollow-bodied twelve-string and streamlined Airline guitars in Colin Newman’s arsenal, to the artful pickguard on Graham Lewis’ souped-up bass, and the sea of unique effects pedals arranged in front of each member’s station. Wire’s embrace of technology has been their hallmark, and their growing cache of technological prowess continues to surprise their audiences.

Graham Lewis of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Graham Lewis of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

Wire started their set with a pair of uptempo selections from their new self-titled album, Blogging and Joust and Jostle. Both tunes display the quick beats, angular chords, and short length that has become their signature style. The low-tone hook-laden punk sounds just as fresh as their classic album catalog.

Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

Their set continued with more new material peppered with choice picks from recent albums like Stealth of a Stork and early work like Blessed State. The sonic showcases during Sleep-Walking and their final song Harpooned were fantastic to behold. Guitarist Matthew Simms’ technical musicianship and dexterity was on full display, with incredible feedback, synthesized solos, and brilliant electronic textures on his lefty Fender and lap slide guitars.

Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

After a brief departure, they returned for a final encore kicked off with Adore Your Island from Change Becomes Us and closed out the night with more fan favorites, including a rare song from Pink Flag. Wire is known for not doing fan requests, but hopefully they’ll oblige to their great group of devotees and return to Cleveland on their next tour.

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