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Goldmines Interview and Photo Recap

If you ask anyone in Goldmines how they’re doing, chances are they’ll say that they’re really busy. Cleveland’s femme foursome of Mandy Look, Jeanna Lax, Heather Gmucs, and Roseanna Safos are ready to keep their momentum going into 2017. After spending the end of last year supporting their self-titled EP release, Mandy and Roseanna took a moment from their relentless schedules to speak with Blown Speakers, before their recent performance with R.Ring and Split Single at the Happy Dog in Cleveland.

So R. Ring, are you excited to play with them?
Mandy Look: Yeah. Roseanna’s like, “What, one of my main idols is stopping through?”
Roseanna Safos: My only main, I mean, her, and the other one is Kim. You know what I mean?
ML: Yeah. And she’s like, up there for me.
RS: If I really explained how happy I am, it’d sound scary. We’ve played with Kelley. We’ve played with The Breeders before, and then we played with R. Ring, too. And then I’ve played with R. Ring too, with other bands. So we kind of know each other. My friend plays drums for her, so they asked us to do the show together, and I was really, really happy.
ML: Yeah, it was awesome!
RS: We were all just like “!” — Also Kelley Deal shared a Goldmines video, and that was pretty cool. So we’re excited for the show. I can’t wait.
ML: I do appreciate how political Kelley Deal has gotten, too. Not incredibly political, but for the right reasons. Speaking for musicians, and about how we need healthcare, and how we need things like the ACA. We’re going to try to work different angles to be friends with her. So I may talk to her a lot.
RS: Yeah. You do that.
ML: Yeah, I’ll do that, and be like, “If you ever need a guitar player or a drummer, we’ll drive down and practice!”

Do you feel the same kind of commitment to those kind of issues? You know, being a band from Cleveland and experiencing everything that’s been going on lately?
ML: Definitely. One thing that’s happening now is that you can’t do just one thing. It’s like the gig economy. You play in a band, but you also have to work a day job, and if you wanna be able to pursue any kind of art, you’re gonna be poor. Unless you’re born rich, you know? For the most part, like 99% of people. So I think those things are very important, to continue the arts and affect the community. Because, I mean, communities will just die out if you don’t have the artists, and they’re not really making money. I mean, not like they used to. Being in a band, I think a lot people don’t realize how much playing live music brings to the community. When you come see a band, you’re going to the restaurant next door to eat dinner, or you’re going to a nearby store to pick something up, you’re tipping the bartenders, you’re helping a small local business.
RS: And you’re gonna spread happiness.

Goldmines Cleveland band by Mara Robinson
Mandy Look of Goldmines by Mara Robinson

Ready for the split

The Thursday night dinner crowd at the Happy Dog comfortably occupied the back tables and choice spots along the bar. While most folks were enjoying a tall draft or a tricked-out hot dog, Roseanna and Mandy were both sipping coffee and fueling up for practice later that night.

ML: We’ve all been so busy lately! We can’t get together and speak!
RS: But we’ve all been the busiest we’ve ever been, I feel. But we still do it.
ML: Yeah, sort of. Yeah. We make it work.
RS: We gotta get back on a regular schedule. We all want it.
ML: I’m sure, as you know, everyone’s lives just get in the way. And it seems like we’ve got the most attention this year when we’ve been the least active, in a way. Which is cool. I guess it’s cause we released a record, so that helps push out things.
RS: And it took forever for the split to come out.
ML: Yeah, but it’s coming out at a good time.
RS: Our split’s coming out with Shitbox Jimmy. Well, our record just came out, but our split with Shitbox Jimmy is coming out. Do you know where I booked the show for the release? You don’t know. But I booked it at The Phantasy Theater, just to be fun. I used to play there in the ’90s and had a ton of fun, and I know what it’s become. So I got a hold of them, and I’m like, “We’re gonna do it my way.” They were so excited to do it! We’re going to do it with my cover, one of my door people, no pre-sale, no credit charge. It should be a really fun show. A good excuse to go to the Phantasy before it turns into condos probably.

That’s a shame. It’s good that you got something going on with it, though.
RS: I know! Actually the guy who books there, he was in my very first band in high school. So he was like, whatever you want. You can book it or play it, you can do whatever you want. That’s cool.

Goldmines Cleveland band by Mara Robinson
Heather Gmucs and Roseanna Safos of Goldmines by Mara Robinson

RS: The songs, that record, our split, Heather made like how many? Like, Heather does the Wax Mage thing. And I think they’re all sold out, the ones that she made. How many did she make?
ML: I think 50?
RS: OK, so that’s just her own thing, like she’ll make like 50 cool albums. When do we get them?
ML: I think she said she was putting them into production.
RS: It’s exciting! It’s gonna be really good. Shitbox Jimmy side is awesome, too.

So Wax Mage is Heather’s project?
ML: Yeah, she and Sarah Barker, and they kinda just run it out of Gotta Groove. Gotta Groove lets them do what they want, and they just pay Gotta Groove for it in their time, which is awesome. For Gotta Groove, too, because they’re not taking ownership of them. It opened up a whole new world for Heather where she was kinda running a label. It’s just something she always wanted to do. Even though it’s not officially a label, but I think with Quality Time, they partnered up in a way, where Quality Time, they’re doing the work to do the distribution and stuff, and Heather does pre-sales to help pay for the record production. It seems to work.
RS: And they do cool compilations.
ML: And it’s cool for Cleveland, because people around the world are following them. With the Goldmines record, people have bought them across the country just because they’re more interested in the record art, in a way. But then they get the music and Heather’s like, “I’ve been getting a lot of feedback on the record.” And that’s cool. It’s good they’re not disappointed in the record they’re buying. So it’s very symbiotic.

Goldmines Cleveland band by Mara Robinson
Roseanna Safos of Goldmines by Mara Robinson

Back in the van

On top of all of these preparations for their new release, Goldmines embarked on a tour of the Midwest through the month of April in support of acclaimed songwriter and Cleveland music legend, Craig Bell, formerly of Rocket From The Tombs, The Down-fi, and Mirrors.

RS: When I played with Bim in Obnox, he was just like everywhere. And The Gizmos. He saw Goldmines play at Studio-A-Rama. Mirrors played there, and he remembered when he saw me play with Obnox in Indianapolis. And then, when Goldmines played in Indy, he would go see us. So we know each other pretty well, but he just loves Goldmines. So he asked us to do it. He actually wanted to do more shows, but Mandy’s been super busy with her work. Craig Bell is the nicest man on Earth. He’s so active in so many projects like all the time.
ML: I wish we could’ve done more. We were supposed to do a couple more.
RS: Indiana would’ve been fun, but Mandy’s just busy. I mean, we’re all pretty busy. Very busy. But, that Columbus show we’re playing with DANA, too. Have you ever heard of DANA? Columbus band, DANA. They’re really cool.
ML: Did you tell me about them? Or have I heard about them?
RS: Uh, they’ve been playing a few times, they’re on Instagram and stuff. But they’re cool. They’re kinda harder. The lady plays like a Theremin.
ML: Oh! Heather was showing me a video, she saw them playing on a thing. She said it sounds amazing. Oh she’s going to be so happy.
RS: Well, I told her. And I’m like, “Yeah, I’ve known that band for a long time.”

RS: I got a new van. Well, I got a 2015 Dodge Minivan. Pretty new. It’s the nicest thing I’ve ever had. I’ve had, this is like my seventh one. Transmission issues. Always transmission. But that’s why I built my credit up like crazy. Because I never had credit. For this reason, for this van. So I got the van, saved up money. It’s pretty cool. We’re gonna hit the road and not be fearful.
ML: Which is really exciting for our band.
RS: So we don’t have to rent.
ML: That stopped us. Actually, you wouldn’t think a van would stop you, like not having a vehicle to travel in. We used to travel so much because in HotChaCha we had a van, and going out of town was not a huge ordeal. You don’t take two or three cars. It’s like, now we can just hop into her minivan like a family.
RS: One of the other things we did, we rented. And it sucked. And it’s so expensive! And then, before there, we borrowed a van, and then we had some trouble. And it wasn’t our van. We were responsible but felt kinda shitty and we kinda felt like, “What? Why are we..?” So I got a van.

Goldmines Cleveland band by Mara Robinson
Jeanna Lax, Mady Look, and Roseanna Safos of Goldmines by Mara Robinson

Riding the next wave

While Goldmines continue to promote their latest releases, they’ve also focused on crafting new songs and sharpening their musical ideas. Their signature sound of sixties-style vocal harmonies doused in reverb-driven guitars and supercharged with hard garage rhythm comes from a wide range of influences.

ML: I think when Goldmines started I had this idea of us being ’60s influenced, kinda like the girl-group thing, but more like ’60s garage rock, you know? I just love it. Now, I’m like really into this idea of us being more like a Heart-esqe, glammy band.
RS: Yeah, that would be cool.
ML: Our new single on the split is really rockin’. It’s probably my favorite song I’ve ever written. It’s really tough and cool and rock ‘n’ roll. It’s cool, very cool. So that’s kinda where I’m drawing from. I mean, of course, I like everything. The ’90s is probably my prime time of growing up music. I’m trying to get back into that. I don’t really go on my iTunes. I don’t know, it sucks with technology. You get rid of all your CDs and you have all your iTunes. I don’t really even look at my iTunes anymore. But I need to get into it. Like, there’s too much Sebadoah I haven’t listened to, and I’m like, “I used to love that album.” Then I always think of all these other albums that I want to listen to, or these weird bands.
RS: I gotta force myself to go buy a record this week. There are some new artists that really, really grab me, and I just have to have it, but not so much like I used to.
ML: (to Roseanna) Are you drawing from anything?
RS: Like in, us, in Goldmines?
ML: I don’t know. I guess.
RS: I’ve been trying to get into like a post-punk kind of thing. Well, because I heard some old HotChaCha stuff, that split we did with We Are Hex. And we were just fucking around, and it technically wasn’t that great, but what you did on your part was so good, well because you’re so good at that style, too.
ML: I felt that kinda in Goldmines. Now I can play chords.
RS: Well, yeah, because we’re not that band. You know what I mean?
ML: In HotChaCha, I didn’t play one chord ever. I was just playing notes.
RS: But you’re so good. You’re creative.
ML: I don’t think I knew how to play chords. No, I did, yeah, I did! I just liked technology.

Goldmines Cleveland band by Mara Robinson
Jeanna Lax and Mandy Look of Goldmines by Mara Robinson

RS: (Notices song playing in the background.) Oh, I love this song.
ML: We’re looking for a song to cover.
RS: Oh my God! I would love to cover this!
ML: I think we could cover this.
RS: We’ll do it our way.
ML: You know, we’ve had a lot of ideas. And then we try and do it, and like if it just doesn’t fit into how we are, you know, we don’t push it. Usually, honestly, I think everything I’ve covered we’ve been at a bar together and was like, “We should cover it!” We’ll probably end up covering this, because it’s just gonna — It’s like always a magical happenstampede.

Goldmines will perform next at the release show for their upcoming 12″ vinyl split release with Shitbox Jimmy on Friday, May 5th at the Phantasy Theater in Lakewood, Ohio. The “Cinco De Mayo” celebration is presented by Panza Foundation, Wax Mage, and Quality Time Records, and will include Goldmines, Shitbox Jimmy, Dime Disguise, and The Safeties.

Dark Rides and Grim Visions

I’m the worst person to be attempting a review for New Planet Trampoline’s new release Dark Rides and Grim Visions. 1) It’s taken me weeks to write this. Poor Mara at Blown Speakers has asked me for it at least half a dozen times. Each time I get ready to send it, I read what I wrote, and immediately start over. Now Blown Speakers won’t get the scoop on this album. Hell, even Scene beat us to it. 2) I’ve been drinking the kool-aid on these guys for a long time. My fandom began indirectly sometime in 2003 or 2004. Any preconceptions of impartiality should be immediately forgotten. I’m sure this review will eventually contain a few witty phrases and unique adjective combinations, but first it’s story time kids…

Cleveland’s music scene full on tongued my ears in my mid-20s. An old friend of mine started playing with a band called the Dreadful Yawns. I fell in love with them, to say the least. Booking tours and signing record contracts eventually led to playing and touring with them. All along the way New Planet was right there. 4 of the 5 members of New Planet were the original Yawns line up. My appreciation of the Yawns always came with the headaches of logistics, van breakdowns, and touring. NPT, however, was like a favorite nephew. I could enjoy spending time with them as much as I wanted, without having to fight about artwork or budgets.

New Planet Trampoline released The Curse of The New Planet Trampoline back in 2004. At the time, I couldn’t believe that anyone I knew could have written and recorded such an adventure by themselves in a moldy basement in Lakewood. It was an incredible blend of Farfisa, harmonies, searing guitars, and tripped out bass lines. Totally different than the quiet twinkle of Yawns. New Planet’s The Blimps and Aeroplanes EP came out a year later and I was so certain that these guys were about to graduate to cocaine, hookers, and A&R guys. I had grand visions of New Planet getting signed, getting a booking agent, and dragging the Yawns on the road with them. You know, tour the world. Seriously. Completely engrossing, vivid daydreams…

It wasn’t to be…

Shortly before NPT broke up, they played live on a radio show I hosted. For nearly a decade those would be the only recordings I had of the “new” material they were working on at the time. NPT came back from a short tour and announced they were playing their final show. I was devastated.  It seemed certain that recordings of songs like The Nearly Finished Face, Haunted as Fuck, Birds and others would only exist on a drug addled, half-assed produced, college radio show.

Thankfully, that wasn’t to be…

That’s why Grim Visions is such a mind fuck for me. Almost half of the album consists of these incredible songs from a band I thought was in their prime 10 years ago on a college radio show. The other half of the album proves that I was wrong. They are only starting to hit their prime. Matt Cassidy’s guitar is just as ear shatteringly loud on record as it is live. Ben Gmetro’s Farfisa is punchy, melodic, whimsical, and haunting. Charlie Druesedow’s drumming is so spot on I don’t even remember what drummer joke I was gonna make, and that is some divine shit. Dave Molnar’s bass playing is as good a reason as any to put down your bass and become an accountant, because you’ll never be able to write bass lines like that.

I hesitate to say that NPT picks up right where they left off. Sure, a lot of these tunes made up their live set when the called it quits, but they sound better after marinading for a decade. The songs sound more confident, the performances more otherworldly, every aspect is amplified. The album is haunting, creepy even, if not for the sudden bursts of pop goodness that makes it feel like classic psychedelia, without the Freedom Rock tropes. Dark Rides and Grim Visions is a psychedelic swirling wave of crafted pop, thick harmonies, killer bass lines, and floating Farfisa. It’s disorienting and reassuring. It’s 420, brah.

Simply put, the album is a gleeful ride on a carnival train. The only thing more mind blowing is how NPT pulls it off live. There are few bands better live than NPT… maybe, just maybe, Brian Jonestown Massacre circa 1996… regardless, it’s a very short list.

Check them out at the Happy Dog West on 3/12. They are playing with nice person/face melting super group Hiram-Maxim and Detroit’s Sisters of Your Sunshine Vapour.

It’s $5 at the door, but bring a few extra bucks. You’ll need it for NPT’s Dark Rides and Grim Visions.

The Beyonderers, Surfer Rex, Archie and The Bunkers at The Happy Dog

The Beyonderers, Surfer Rex, and Archie & The Bunkers will perform at The Happy Dog in Cleveland on Friday, March 27, 2015.

The Beyonderers are human, despite rumors to the contrary. Some people call them “surfy,” “twangy” and “thrashy.” Their sound lies somewhere around the midpoint between The Ventures and Megadeth. The simple answer to the questions surrounding their origin is that they are from Akron, OH. The more complex answer goes something like this: Doc (the guitar player) found a crystal amulet while helping to clean out his recently deceased neighbor’ s attic. This amulet seems to have beamed transmissions into Doc’s brain, instructing him to assemble a team of similar humans to carry out sonic experiments from beyond our galaxy.

Surfer Rex, from the Cleveland/north Ohio area, plays vital and infectious instrumental action adventure. Far from oldies or nostalgia, Surfer Rex is pushing the envelope of instrumental surf. Jerry “Mez O’Zoic” Mayer and Tom “Kaiju” Hinders on guitars, Rip “Ultraman” Smops on bass, and John “Godzilla” Koch on drums play multi-layered, guitar-driven surf rock instrumentals that are all about the raw experience of riding ocean waves. Grab a board and dive in with Surfer Rex!

Archie and the Bunkers is a completely original sonic experience. A whirling vintage organ sound driven by a thundering, yet sophisticated pulse from the drums. The vocals range from melodic to a visceral scream. The mixture of garage rock, punk, blues, acid jazz, and boogaloo, create a sound that is A&TB.

Doors open at 9:00 PM.

Electric Citizen, ALBUM, Shitbox Jimmy at The Euclid Tavern

Electric Citizen, ALBUM, and Shitbox Jimmy will perform at The Euclid Tavern in Cleveland on Friday, March 27, 2015.

Formed just over a year ago by guitarist Ross Dolan, vocalist Laura Dolan, Nick Vogelpohl (bass) and Nate Wagner (drums) Electric Citizen have had a busy year turning heads and ears onto their dark and esoteric style of haunting and unhallowed ’60s West Coast rock, and decidedly British-influenced heavy psychedelia. Their debut album “Sateen” draws on sounds synonymous with the roots of early ’70s proto-metal from groups such as Sir Lord Baltimore, Pentagram, and the daemonic spirit of Amon Düül.

ALBUM songs are as much songs as incantations intended to ward demons and turn desk-jockeys into warriors. With an electric arsenal of Holier-than-thou hard rock riffs, heads will bang and fists will pump. Pop-tinged melodies and sluggish heavy progressions will follow you for days.

Shitbox Jimmy have been blazing a trail of garage rock fury through Cleveland’s streets for years, and look to continue their noisy ways in 2015. Fast and catchy songs that may be short on minutes but are long on soul.

Doors open at 9:00 PM.

Electric Citizen, ALBUM, Shitbox Jimmy at The Euclid Tavern in Cleveland, Ohio
Electric Citizen, ALBUM, Shitbox Jimmy at The Euclid Tavern in Cleveland, Ohio