Tag Archives: band

Squeeze live in Akron

Under the giant, illuminated Goodyear logo located east of downtown Akron, the polished granite, red brick and concrete exterior in the center of the rubber company’s former corporate campus looks fairly unassuming. But after walking through the doors into the Goodyear Theater, it’s easy to see why it’s attracting a diverse array of artists, including The Cult, Jason Isbell, Primus, Smashing Pumpkins and Dwight Yoakam. The spacious main hall and balcony of the latest addition to Akron’s growing musical culture captures the grandiose allure of a vintage orchestra stage hall. The character of this amazing venue was perfectly suited for one of England’s most enduring modern rock bands, Squeeze.

Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Squeeze band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Mara Robinson

Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford have toured separately and together as a duo in the past, but this tour marks the return of Squeeze as a full band. Drummer Simon Hanson and keyboardist Steven Large have been performing with Glenn and Chris since the most recent formation took shape in 2007, and the recent additions of Yolanda Charles on bass and Steve Smith (from UK electronic remix outfit Dirty Vegas) on percussion helped keep the upbeat energy going between everyone on stage and in the audience.

Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Chris Difford of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Chris Difford of Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Glenn TIlbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Glenn TIlbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Mara Robinson

Squeeze played a finely curated mix of trademark favorites mingled with cuts spanning their entire career. They started their set with Please Be Upstanding, a song from The Knowledge, their 15th studio album, released in October. The songs from the new album continue to showcase Tilbrook and Difford’s songwriting tandem of new wave British Soul, from upbeat pop tunes to heartfelt ballads. The new material definitely has their unique vibe as much as their past libraries of work, and adds more colors to their musical landscape. The country slide guitar on Patchouli, the operatic vocal solos of Rough Ride, and the bongo beat percussion of Albatross show Squeeze expanding and are not satisfied by standing creatively still.

Squeeze band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Glenn TIlbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Glenn TIlbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Yolanda Charles of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Yolanda Charles of Squeeze by Mara Robinson

With the second song of the set, they promptly moved into their classic hit, Pulling Mussels (from the Shell). Their set included a majority of songs from their 2010 album Spot the Difference, where they re-recorded their greatest hits in identical detail to the original recording. Squeeze’s live performance lived up to the same perfection with every song. They haven’t lost an ounce of the energy and vibrancy that has attracted music fans for decades.

Yolanda Charles, Simon Hanson, and Steve Smith of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Yolanda Charles, Simon Hanson, and Steve Smith of Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Steven Large, Simon Hanson, and Steve Smith of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Steven Large, Simon Hanson, and Steve Smith of Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Steven Large, Simon Hanson, and Steve Smith of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Steven Large, Simon Hanson, and Steve Smith of Squeeze by Mara Robinson

Squeeze packed the last leg of their set with an all-star lineup of their biggest hits. The rhythm section took to the front of the stage for a rousing rendition of Take Me I’m Yours, with hand drums, marching snares, and accordion that got the crowd out of their seats. They kept the fans on their feet by bringing the show home with a rally of their best songs, including Tempted, Goodbye Girl and Up the Junction, and ultimately building up to the rapid disco keyboard melody of Slap and Tickle.

Chris Difford of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Chris Difford of Squeeze by Mara Robinson
Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze by Mara Robinson

After a brief rest from their marathon performance, Squeeze returned to the stage to deliver an encore with two more of their most popular hits, Is That Love? and Black Coffee in Bed. During the final breakdown of Black Coffee in Bed, Glenn and Chris took time to introduce everyone in the band and gave them a moment to shine. The entire crowd stayed on their feet and helped end the night with a bright and soulful call and response of the song’s chorus. With a final gathering at the front of the stage, the band joined together for a final bow to Akron’s appreciative and devoted fans. Squeeze hasn’t lost a step in their stage and songwriting game, and the great response from their new material and their memorable catalog will have an incredible and expanding impact on music fans for a long time.

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Sideshow by the Lakeshore: Luna’s Triumphant Return to Cleveland

Until the Grog booked Luna for last night’s show — their first time back to Cleveland in about 12 years — I honestly hadn’t listened to their records since 2009. They were lost in the CD-selling purges of my thirties. But conveniently, Spotify has a Best of Luna playlist to refresh my memory. Side note — they’re playlists now, not albums. That’s not to say they have any record I dislike; it’s just they get filed away in the drawer of really catchy indie rock songs.

Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson

Music fans like myself compare and contrast bands against their peers. My favorite game to play as a contrarian is to state the greater band is the one with the better catalog. Yo La Tengo are a better band than My Bloody Valentine. Is Loveless a great album? Sure, why not. But Yo La Tengo have plain old done more and therefore reached greater heights, so they’re the better band. People who worship at the altar of meteoric bands miss true greatness.

Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson 
Dean Wareham of Luna by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson

This is the point where writing about Luna gets tricky. They are both timeless and of a very specific time. Who exactly are their peers? The depth of music knowledge on stage last night went clear back to the Platters or Duane Eddy or my beloved Beach Boys. I like record collector rock. Dean Wareham seems like the kind of guy who has walls and walls full of obscure but totally great vinyl albums. But comparing Luna to either their own heroes or part of a revival is short sighted. It’s not revivalist; it’s syntheist.  

Luna by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson

Conversely, trying to place Luna alongside their contemporaries in the 1990s “alt-rock” doesn’t quite line up either. Pavement, Superchunk, Sonic Youth got up at the same time on the same stages, but everyone sounds more like each other than Luna sounds like anyone — a loser contradiction their lyrics often hint at. Luna aimed for a different target and hit it. Their success was on their own terms.

Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson
Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson 

So what happened on stage? For one, the guitars sounded amazing. I’m not a gearhead, but a quick look at the stuff wasn’t complicated, but rather the stack of a band who dialed in their sound. The guitars sounded rich and full, with beautiful overtones and carefully sculpted reverb. The shimmering sound I heard probably sounds identical in every room they play. The economy of sound extended into the playing. The solos were similar to their records, and they were written right the first time, so a brief guitar solo (and one bass solo) kept the songs moving. For a band that prides themselves on the consistent dynamics of the rhythm section, the songs moved great.

Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson
Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson
Luna band by Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson

When I was bullshitting online the day of the show, my friend Pete posted he found the first grey hairs in his beard, even though he’s been balding for years. I saw him later that night, and at age 32, he was one of the youngest people in the room. Luna are not minting new fans, and their setlist played liked it. Hits like Pup Tent, Chinatown, Bewitched. We joked about waiting around for the Velvet Underground cover, but it never came, although they did throw in a Cure cover. Their catalog is enshrined in the memories of their fans, and their fans know their influences well enough that all they had to do was run through the hits, have fun doing it, and everyone walked away happy. BTW Pete’s single.

Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson

Do you know the difference between classic rock and oldies? I do, and I bet you do too. Now, if you happen to be a Luna fan, ask yourself where do they fit in? Not do they sound like The Champs vs The Eagles, but are Luna part of a culture that has endured against the ebb and flow of fashion, or are they part of an emerging industry of keeping musicians employed, on the road and somewhat happy? Luna fans have been waiting a decade to see this show, a reasonable amount of time for side projects and time off, and not subject to the diminishing returns of the Pixies reunion. They walked off the stage happy, and their fans felt the same.

Luna band by Cleveland music photographer Mara Robinson
Luna by Mara Robinson

See more photos here

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Photo recap: Howard at Musica

Akron was the first stop for Brooklyn-based Howard Saturday February 20 at Musica.

Fronted by Howard Feibusch, we saw the band last year at Nelsonville Music Festival. He and bassist Myles Heff performed a stripped-down acoustic set, as their drummer hadn’t yet joined the tour. Here’s our set of photos.

Howard Feibusch and Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch and Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch and Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
Howard Feibusch and Myles Heff (Howard) at Musica by Mara Robinson
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Wire at the Beachland Ballroom

DJ Party Sweat spinning before Wire at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson
DJ Party Sweat spinning before Wire at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

From the moment we entered the nostalgic flyer-covered walls of the Beachland Ballroom, it truly felt like stepping into an underground club from the 80s. The groove of DJ Party Sweat’s pulsating vinyl beats set the soundtrack before the ambient pop-noise stylings of Julian Lynch. His solo performance captured the early audience’s attention, with a whispered voice, multi-color guitar, and two briefcases stacked with effects and processors.

Wire (Graham Lewis, Robert Grey, Colin Newman) live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Wire (Graham Lewis, Robert Grey, Colin Newman) live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

With their fourteenth studio album and a career that spans over thirty years, Wire has earned a no-nonsense reputation, especially when it comes to their stage performance. That level of respect for their craft is equally reflected by the devotion of the fans who filled the ballroom floor.

Colin Newman of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Colin Newman of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

The front of the stage was a guitar and gear lover’s dream: from the massive Eastwood hollow-bodied twelve-string and streamlined Airline guitars in Colin Newman’s arsenal, to the artful pickguard on Graham Lewis’ souped-up bass, and the sea of unique effects pedals arranged in front of each member’s station. Wire’s embrace of technology has been their hallmark, and their growing cache of technological prowess continues to surprise their audiences.

Graham Lewis of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Graham Lewis of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

Wire started their set with a pair of uptempo selections from their new self-titled album, Blogging and Joust and Jostle. Both tunes display the quick beats, angular chords, and short length that has become their signature style. The low-tone hook-laden punk sounds just as fresh as their classic album catalog.

Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

Their set continued with more new material peppered with choice picks from recent albums like Stealth of a Stork and early work like Blessed State. The sonic showcases during Sleep-Walking and their final song Harpooned were fantastic to behold. Guitarist Matthew Simms’ technical musicianship and dexterity was on full display, with incredible feedback, synthesized solos, and brilliant electronic textures on his lefty Fender and lap slide guitars.

Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.
Matthew Simms of Wire live at the Beachland Ballroom. Photo by Mara Robinson.

After a brief departure, they returned for a final encore kicked off with Adore Your Island from Change Becomes Us and closed out the night with more fan favorites, including a rare song from Pink Flag. Wire is known for not doing fan requests, but hopefully they’ll oblige to their great group of devotees and return to Cleveland on their next tour.

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